War of talents and employer branding

Employer branding is a good answer to face a growing shortage of qualified workforce. Culture, leadership, a clear vision, transparency and trust are the ingredients of a strong employer branding. All of these values, will allow you to build a coherent speech, which can be spread by your collaborators

Mickael DUCHOZE

Mickael DUCHOZE

Recruitment and HR project specialist

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Many human resources experts agree on one point: in the coming years, some sectors of the economy will have to face a growing shortage of qualified workforce. Sales people, IT developers, design and development engineers are the scarcest profiles in today’s business.

From this statement, one question can be asked: how can we attract these demanded profiles and retain them permanently in your company?

An efficient employer branding policy seems to be an adequate answer to this problem of talent shortages. Nevertheless, it is necessary to specify what components constitute the employer branding concept.

The term “employer branding” was used for the first time in 1990 by Simon Barrow, president of People in Business. It defines the image that both the employees and the potential future employees (candidates) have of a specific company. This definition, points out the importance of attracting the right young talents and retain the best performers.

Employer branding implies several aspects which we will be described below.

The first component is the image that your employees have of your company. This image must be built around strong values and be identifiable by all your employees. Culture, leadership, a clear vision, transparency and trust are the ingredients of a strong employer branding. All of these values, will allow you to build a coherent speech, which can be spread by your collaborators.

The second component is the external image of your company. How is your company perceived by the public? Your potential candidates? Your partners?

This point could be the most important in order to build a strong employer branding; and maybe one of the most difficult to reach.

Finally, the third component of the employer branding is the HR offer of your company. What compensations and benefits and internal mobility policies do you have in place? Is it possible for your employees to work remotely?

An effective employer branding policy must take into account these three components. Thomas Chardin, French professor at the University Pantheon-Assas (Paris) differentiates four components of the employer branding:

  • Internal employer branding.
  • External employer branding.
  • Employer identity.
  • Employer practices.

The first benefit is a stronger commitment from your employees and a reduction of the turnover rate. To be more precised, strong and clear values will encourage the commitment of your employees at work.

The second benefit, is a greater success in recruiting demanded profiles on the labour market. By making your business attractive, you will increase your chances of recruitment.

Finally, an effective employer branding allows your employees to strengthen your company’s recommendations externally. Employees who feel good at work, will naturally promote your company to their family and friends. To learn more about this topic, you should read our article, from Sven Berger, which talks about well-being at work: https://www.irh-partner.com/en/well-being-and-identity-at-work/

We all have a friend who one day made us want to join his company. This is the best vector of your employer branding.

In summary, the employer branding is a good answer to face a growing shortage of qualified workforce. In our next article, we will explain you how an efficient HRIS could be an amazing tool for your employer branding. 

Sources:

Qu’est-ce que la marque employeur

Guide du management > La marque employeur

10 talents pour lesquels vous serez recrutés

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